3 Days to Live; 3 Days to Die

I had the pleasure of reading John Avery's book titled, Three Days to Die, and decided to leave a review on Amazon. While there, I read the following words: John Avery loves to write stories that force good people into horrifying situations – just to see how they react. I can definitely attest to that being the case in this story.

 

For example, Aaron Quinn is a 13-year-old boy whose life was wholesome until his father died in the line of duty. Could he have imagined that, years later, his mother would marry a man who would turn their lives upside down? What about Willy, Aaron's best friend, whose parents died, leaving him to be raised by grandparents in the winter years of their lives?

 

There was certainly a lot of fast-paced action and plot twists and turns in Three Days to Die and the suspense mounted as each page turned. I caught myself taking a few minutes break, sometimes, so I wouldn't become over-excited; other times, I would be quickly turning the pages, almost afraid to breathe for fear I would miss something.

 

I witnessed, firsthand, how three people had it all, yet lost everything. Three Days to Die introduced me to a world involving bank robberies and the characters (in this novel) who robbed them. I got to know intimate details of these robbers and one man in particular, a former doctor, felt like a best friend. I wanted to kick him in the butt for getting involved in such a lifestyle, even after learning his reasons.

 

The other adult bank robbers didn't appeal to me as much; they were well written characters but I just didn't like their personalities. Even so, I did get a sense of the leader wishing he had children of his own - that life had turned out differently.

 

I really enjoyed the way John Avery showed his characters' strengths and weaknesses; I admired the way he could make me feel sympathetic to the bank robbers, yet not feel sorry for Aaron's step-father and the fate which had befallen him.

 

Looking inwardly, I would have to admit that child abuse factored into the situation and, when I hear of such situations occurring, I can't help but feel crushed and shattered, praying children affected by such an existence would be delivered to good, loving homes.

 

Sadly, too many cases go unreported and, even sadder, some innocent parents are accused of being abusive, having their children ripped from their loving arms.

 

Three Days to Die brought home some important truths, one of them being: not every stranger will bring you danger. Of course, as any cautious parent, I watch closely if I am in a strange town or city and a person tries befriending one of my children.

 

However, I have a real problem with the whole: you shouldn't talk to strangers, idea because it's inevitable that it will happen at some point in the future, no matter how a person tries to prevent it. Even going through a checkout in a department or grocery store, you are bound to strike up a conversation with someone you don't know. 

 

I would much prefer for my children and I to be able to carry on a conversation with a stranger - albeit, not providing intimate details of our lives - for the simple fact that asking for the assistance of a stranger could mean the difference between life and death, at some point.

 

Thankfully, I trust my instincts and, thus far, they have served us well. In fact, my children and I have met many people over the years whom we consider friends.

 

In conclusion, I really enjoyed the time I spent in this world John Avery created - a world in which either of the characters could have had three days to die, depending upon how circumstances would unfold.

 

It's a novel that is sure to appeal to any man or woman who enjoys reading suspense and action-packed titles. It will also appeal to teenagers since the main character in the story is a teenage boy.

 

However, every reader (including myself) is provided with an accurate glimpse of how life can go from absolute bliss to a horrible nightmare in the matter of a few hours. Hopefully, we will be more thankful for our blessings and our family and friends. After all, do we really know what tomorrow will bring? What if we only had three days to live, three days until we were to die?

 

I would really encourage you to take the time to read this book. Just click on the book cover to be taken to its page on Amazon.